The Seasons – Kindergarten

 

 The Seasons

Grade level: Kindergarten

Outcome: NSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (e.g., soil, water, landform, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time. [DM, SI]

Our Web:

Experiential Learning Station #1 (Fall/Autumn):

Experience Description: In this experiential learning station students will explore the season of fall/autumn. Students will have the opportunity to learn about this season through online resources, possible field trips, books, online (web based) resources, and hands on materials. Hands on materials to explore includes art materials and other objects that are found outdoors throughout the fall/autumn season.

 

Curriculum Outcome: NSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (e.g., soil, water, landform, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time. [DM, SI]

 

Curriculum Connections– Science: MOK.1 Investigate observable characteristics of familiar objects and materials in their environment. [SI], Arts Education: CPK.4 Create artworks that express own observations and ideas about the world., CPK.2 View and interpret the basic message of visuals and objects in a variety of texts including models, photographs, dramas, dance

creations, and videos. English: CRK.2 View and interpret the basic message of visuals and objects in a variety of texts including models, photographs, dramas, dance creations, and videos. Treaty Education: SIK2 : Express personal connectedness to nature and one another (e.g., Circle of Life, seasons, elements, weather, families, and relatives). Social Studies: DRK.3 Analyze ways in which place and physical systems influence daily life, including the influence of place on the daily life of First Nations and Métis people.

 

First Nation and Metis Connections: Incorporating the Medicine Wheel of First Nation and Metis ways of knowing for Autumn:

– Spiritual: Students will learn the importance of autumn to people, animals, and plant life.

– Physical: Students will learn why we have autumn and how it affects their people, animals, and plants. They will also learn the repercussions if there was no autumn.

– Emotional: Students will be able to appreciate the season of autumn. They will look at things that they like and dislike in autumn.

– Mindful: Students will learn how people, animals and plants prepare for autumn.

 

Connections to the Anti-Bias Text: This can be connected to p.136 of the Anti-Bias Text: “ … advocate the principle of inviting children to learn about other children’s holidays, rather than asking them to celebrate the holidays in the classroom.” By having this learning center it is not pushing the children to believe in particular holidays, but rather embrace what the season has to offer.

 

Directions: *Refer to the picture of the setup of this learning station* Be sure to have a big enough space (whether it is on the floor, on a table, or an accommodated surface) to set up this learning station that you feel would best suite the learning styles of your students. Be sure to have the materials needed, or similar materials, that are to be/ can be used for this learning station. Arrange all of your materials according to the amount of space you are using.

 

Materials Needed: Brown crinkle paper, burlap, leaves, pine cones, glue (white & stick), pastels, paint, paint pallets or jars, paint brushes, paper- (white, orange, yellow, red, brown), a print out of a tree trunk, and buttons.

 

Space considerations: This learning station can be set up on a medium sized table or a large sized table. And if preferred, can be set up on the floor. This station would enhance learning experiences more if it were set up with more space.

 

Resources:

Printed Resources:

Fiction:

  • “Why Do Leaves Change Color” by Besty Maestro Illustrated by Loretta Krupinski (Scholastic).
  • “The Runaway Pumpkin” by Kevin Lewis Illustrated by S.D. Schindler (Scholastic).
  • “Dappled Apples” by Jan Carr Illustrated by Dorothy Donohue (Scholastic).

Non-Fiction

  • “Fall Changes” by Ellen B. Senisi (Scholastic)

Web Resources:

Community Resources:

Experiential Learning Station #2 (Winter):

Experience Description: In this experiential learning station students will explore the season of winter. Students will have the opportunity to learn about this season through online resources, possible field trips, books, online (web based) resources, and hands on materials. Hands on materials to explore includes art materials and other objects that are found outdoors throughout the winter season.

 

Curriculum OutcomeNSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (e.g., soil, water, landform, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time. [DM, SI]

 

Curriculum Connections– Science: MOK.1 Investigate observable characteristics of familiar objects and materials in their environment. [SI], Treaty Education: SIK2 : Express personal connectedness to nature and one another (e.g., Circle of Life, seasons, elements, weather, families, and relatives). Social Studies: DRK.3 Analyze ways in which place and physical systems influence daily life, including the influence of place on the daily life of First Nations and Métis people. Math: PK.1 Demonstrate an understanding of repeating patterns (two or three elements) by:

-identifying

-reproducing

-extending

-creating

Patterns using manipulatives, sounds, and actions. [EC, CN, PS, V]

 

First Nation and Metis Connections: Incorporating the Medicine Wheel of First Nation and Metis for Winter:

– Spiritual: Students will learn the importance of winter to people, animals, and plant life.

– Physical: Students will learn why we have winter and how it affects their people, animals, and plants. They will also learn the repercussions if there was no winter.

– Emotional: Students will be able to appreciate the season of winter. They will look at things that they like and dislike in winter.

– Mindful: Students will learn how people, animals and plants prepare for winter.

 

Connections to the Anti-Bias Text: This can be connected to p.136 in the Anti-Bias text: “ … learning about a holiday means teaching children about what the holiday means to the cultural or religious groups who honor it and the various ways these groups choose to celebrate it.” By having this learning center it is not pushing the children to believe in particular holidays, but rather embrace what the season has to offer.

 

Directions: *Refer to the picture of the setup of this learning station* Be sure to have a big enough space (whether it is on the floor, on a table, or an accommodated surface) to set up this learning station that you feel would best suite the learning styles of your students. Be sure to have the materials needed, or similar materials, that are to be/ can be used for this learning station. Arrange all of your materials according to the amount of space you are using.

 

Materials Needed: Fake snow, snowflake cutter, sparkly paper (blue and silver), paper (blue, grey, & white), cotton balls, Q-tips, glue (white & stick), buttons, slurpee cup lids, ribbon, googly eyes, water beads, chalk, jars or dishes (to put smaller items in- i.e. cotton balls, Q-tips, googly eyes, etc.), scissors, and a clear tub.

 

Space Considerations: This learning station can be set up on a medium sized table or a large sized table. And if preferred, can be set up on the floor. This station would enhance learning experiences more if it were set up with more space.

 

Resources:

Print Resources:

Fiction:

  • “One Snowy Day” by Jeffrey Scherer (Scholastic).
  • “Here Comes the Snow” by Angela Shelf Medearis, Illustrated by Maxie Cambliss (Scholastic).
  • “Best Friends in the Snow” by Angela Shelf Medearis, Illustrated by Ken Wilson-Max (Scholastic).
  • “I Am Snow” by Jean Marzollo, Illustrated by Judith Moffatt (Scholastic).
  • “The Mitten” Adapted and Illustrated by Jan Brett (Scholastic).

Non-Fiction:

  • “I Can Read About Seasons” by Robyn Supraner (Scholastic)

Web Resources:

Community Resources:

Experiential Learning Station #3 (Spring):

Experience Description: In this experiential learning station students will explore the season of spring. Students will have the opportunity to learn about this season through online resources, possible field trips, books, online (web based) resources, and hands on materials. Hands on materials to explore includes art materials and other objects that are found outdoors throughout the spring season.

 

Curriculum OutcomeNSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (e.g., soil, water, landform, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time. [DM, SI]

 

Curriculum Connections– Science: LTK.1 Examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people in their local environment. [CP, SI], FEK.1 Examine the effects of physical forces, magnetic forces, light energy, sound energy, and heat energy, on objects in their environment. [SI] Treaty Education: SIK2 : Express personal connectedness to nature and one another (e.g., Circle of Life, seasons, elements, weather, families, and relatives).Social Studies: DRK.3 Analyze ways in which place and physical systems influence daily life, including the influence of place on the daily life of First Nations and Métis people.

 

First Nation and Metis Connections: Incorporating the Medicine Wheel of First Nation and Metis for Spring:

– Spiritual: Students will learn the importance of spring to people, animals, and plant life.

– Physical: Students will learn why we have spring and how it affects their people, animals, and plants. They will also learn the repercussions if there was no spring.

– Emotional: Students will be able to appreciate the season of spring. They will look at things that they like and dislike in spring.

– Mindful: Students will learn how people, animals and plants prepare for spring.

 

Connections to the Anti-Bias Text: This can be connected to p.136 in the Anti-Bias text: “ … Respecting cultural diversity means recognizing that everyone has the right to his or her beliefs and traditions, including holidays – and no family’s traditions are disrespected.” This learning center not only embraces what this season has to offer, but also helps the students understand that not all students beliefs are the same.

 

Directions: *Refer to the picture of the setup of this learning station* Be sure to have a big enough space (whether it is on the floor, on a table, or an accommodated surface) to set up this learning station that you feel would best suite the learning styles of your students. Be sure to have the materials needed, or similar materials, that are to be/ can be used for this learning station. Arrange all of your materials according to the amount of space you are using.

 

Materials Needed: Dirt, cardboard pots, seeds, a pitcher of water, tissue paper (orange, purple, yellow, red, and pink), pipe cleaners (green, black, and brown), paper (orange, yellow, pink, purple, red, green, light blue, and white), petals, buttons, glue (white & stick), dixie cups, scissors, and a clear tub.

 

Space Considerations: This learning station can be set up on a medium sized table or a large sized table. And if preferred, can be set up on the floor. This station would enhance learning experiences more if it were set up with more space.

 

Resources:

Print Resources:

Fiction:

  • “Gregory’s Shadow” by Don Treeman (Scholastic).
  • “Wake Me in Spring” by James Preller Illustrated by Jeffrey Scherer (Scholastic).
  • “Splish, Splash, Spring” by Jan Carr Illustrated by Dorothy Donohue (Scholastic)
  • “Groundhog Day” by Betsy Lewin (Scholastic).

Non-Fiction:

  • “Do Plants Eat Meat” produced  by Miles Kelly Publishing Limited (Southwestern)

Web Resources:

Community Resources:

Experiential Learning Station #4 (Summer):

Experience Description: In this experiential learning station students will explore the season of summer. Students will have the opportunity to learn about this season through online resources, possible field trips, books, online (web based) resources, and hands on materials. Hands on materials to explore includes art materials and other objects that are found outdoors throughout the summer season.

 

Curriculum OutcomeNSK.1 Explore features of their natural surroundings (e.g., soil, water, landform, and weather conditions), including changes to those surroundings over time. [DM, SI]

 

Curriculum Connections– Science: FEK.1 Examine the effects of physical forces, magnetic forces, light energy, sound energy, and heat energy, on objects in their environment. [SI], LTK.1 examine observable characteristics of plants, animals, and people in their local environment. [CP, SI] Treaty Education: SIK2 : Express personal connectedness to nature and one another (e.g., Circle of Life, seasons, elements, weather, families, and relatives). Social Studies: DRK.3 Analyze ways in which place and physical systems influence daily life, including the influence of place on the daily life of First Nations and Métis people.

 

First Nation and Metis Connections: Incorporating the Medicine Wheel of First Nation and Metis for Summer:

– Spiritual: Students will learn the importance of summer to people, animals, and plant life.

– Physical: Students will learn why we have summer and how it affects their people, animals, and plants. They will also learn the repercussions if there was no summer.

– Emotional: Students will be able to appreciate the season of summer. They will look at things that they like and dislike in summer.

– Mindful: Students will learn how people, animals and plants prepare for summer.

 

Connections to the Anti-Bias Text: This can be connected to the opening quote on p.135 by Rita Tenorio in the chapter Learning About Holidays and Fairness in the Anti-Bias text: “We do not do holidays in ways that would exclude any children in our school. We make a distinction between everyone participating in an activity to learn about a holiday and everyone celebrating it. “

 

Directions: *Refer to the picture of the setup of this learning station* Be sure to have a big enough space (whether it is on the floor, on a table, or an accommodated surface) to set up this learning station that you feel would best suite the learning styles of your students. Be sure to have the materials needed, or similar materials, that are to be/ can be used for this learning station. Arrange all of your materials according to the amount of space you are using.

 

Materials Needed: Clear tub (x2), kitchen utensils (e.g., whisk, strainer, measuring cups, etc.), blue (or clear) marbles, rocks, sand, scoops (for the sand), sea animals, cut outs of animals-laminated, a dish to separate small items (i.e. the seashells, marbles, rocks, etc.), and buttons.

 

Space Considerations: This learning station can be set up on a medium sized table or a large sized table. And if preferred, can be set up on the floor. This station would enhance learning experiences more if it were set up with more space.

 

Resources:

Print Resources:

Fiction:

  • “Out of the Ocean” by Debra Frasier (Scholastic).
  • “The Ants Go Marching” Illustrated by Jeffrey Scherer (Scholastic).
  • “Mouse’s First Summer” by Lauren Thompson (Simon & Schuster)

Non – Fiction:

  • “Usborne Parents’ Guides: Teach Your Child to Swim” by Susan Meredith (Usborne Books & More)

Web Resources:

Community Resources:

References:

Derman-Sparks, L., & Edwards, J. O. (2010). Anti-bias education: for young children and

ourselves. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

 

Native American Medicine Wheel at The Mesa Creative Arts Center. (n.d.). Retrieved March 25,

2017, from http://mesacreativearts.com/html/medicinewheel.html

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