SI42 (Treaty Ed.) & CP4.3 (Art)

Lesson Plan

Subject: Art and Treaty Education                                 Grade: Four

Outcomes: SI42 & CP4.3

Essential Question:
How has the creation/signing of the treaties impacted the people who live in what we now know as Canada today?
Guiding Question(s):
What was the intent and objectives of treaty signing?
Outcomes: (What should students know, understand and be able to do as a result of this lesson?)
SI42 : Examine the intent of treaty in relation to education.

  • Indicators: Discuss why First Nations signatories believed there was a benefit to both European education and traditional ways of learning.

CP4.3: Assume a range of roles and strategies in drama work, using a Saskatchewan context as inspiration.

  • Indicators: Generate ideas for potential topics and dramatic contexts related to Saskatchewan sources such as local stories, personal experience, land and geography, observations, and current or historical events.

Assessment Strategies:
Pre – assessment- The teacher will ask the students,  “What was the intent and objectives of the signing of treaties.” The teacher will then write the responses up on the board in a web format. The teacher will write the initials of which student said what to keep for their records.

Post – assessment– At the end of the lesson when the teacher brings the students back as a large group and asks them questions such as, “what have they learned?” to see if the group as a whole has understood the lesson. After this is completed the students will then be given an exit slip to complete, either orally or written, to prove (or use as possible documentation) what the students have learned or taken away from this lesson.  Some example questions for the exit slip may be, “Why did First Nations signatories believe that it was good to know both traditional and European ways of knowing?” or “How does the intent and purpose of treaty signing affect us in Saskatchewan?”.

I Can Statements:

  • I can discuss why First Nations signatories believed there was a benefit to both European education and traditional ways of learning.
  • I can assume a range of roles and strategies in drama work, using a Saskatchewan context as inspiration.
  • I can explain the intent and objectives of the signing of treaties.

Instructional Strategies:

  1. Have a timer ready to use when the students begin creating their skits so they know how long, as well as how much more time they have.
  2. Use call and response. For example, “If you can hear me clap once, if you can hear me clap twice…” when regaining the students attention from their group work.
  3. Have a visual, as to what the students have to do. In this case have written instructions on the board.

Adaptive Dimension: Differentiated Learning

  • A possibility for a student who is very active, for this lesson, would be having them as a classroom helper. This would mean, while participating in class activities the student could possibly write the instructions on the board or hand out materials.
  • In this lesson for a student who is very shy you could have them handing out props or writing a script so that they are still actively involved in the activity, but not so that they are way out of their comfort zone.

Materials Needed:White Board, White board marker, exit slips, timer, paper, writing utensils, and props if accessible in the classroom (though it is not necessary).
Learning Experiences:
Set ( 5 min.)

  1. Class will initially start the class by writing the lessons guiding question on the board, “What was the intent and objectives of treaty signing?”.
  2. The teacher will then ask the students if they know about the guiding question.
  3. If needed, the teacher will then give prompts such as, “What were the First Nations peoples intent and objectives of treaty signing?” or “What were the Europeans peoples intent and objectives of treaty signing?” to determine what all of the students know.
  4. The teacher will write the students answers down on the whiteboard in a web format.

Development ( 8-10 min.)

  1. After this the teacher will then give a brief lesson, approximately 3-4 minutes long, about the the intent and purpose of treaty signing covering why it is important to understand both traditional and European ways of knowing.
  2. The teacher will then explain why this occurred, and what the other side of the story is.
  3. Afterwards, the teacher will ask, or direct, students to form groups of about five or six. While writing instructions for what the students are supposed to do on the board.
  4. The students, who are now in groups, will be instructed to form a skit based off of what they just learned.
  5. Students will then make a plan and start practicing their skits while the teacher circulates the class to make sure everyone is on the right track.
  6. After approximately six or so minutes the teacher will then call all of the students back to their seats where each group will then have the opportunity to reenact what they learned (depending on the amount of groups give each group approximately one minute).

Closure ( 3-5 min.)

  1. After all of the skits have been presented the teacher will then have the students come together as a group to ask the students what they learned from the skits and other thought provoking questions.
  2. After the class discussion the teacher will then have an exit slip handed out where the students can either give a written response or orally respond to the question by tell the teacher their answers to the question, about what they have learned.